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Keratoconus and Coronavirus

Middle Aged Couple Multifocal ContactsKeratoconus refers to the thinning and elongation of the cornea, the transparent layers over the eye, into a cone-like shape. That results in blurred vision. Other symptoms include vision difficulties at night and objects appearing to have a glare or halos around them.

If you have keratoconus, several options are available.

For a mild or moderate condition, eyeglasses or soft contact lenses will help. Some people do better with rigid gas permeable (hard) contact lenses. If contact lenses hurt your cornea, scleral lenses are recommended. They vault over the cornea and rest on the sclera, the white part of the eye. For more severe cases of keratoconus, laser treatment and corneal transplants are recommended.

Hygiene for Scleral-Lens Wearers in the Coronavirus Era

As always, hygiene is paramount when you handle and wear scleral lenses, as it is with soft and hard lenses. This means thoroughly washing your hands before touching the lenses, and cleaning and rinsing the lenses with recommended solutions.

Wearing sclerals and other contact lenses during the coronavirus pandemic remains as safe as ever, but it’s even more important now to observe hygiene guidelines. In fact, you can take extra precautions to lower the risk of inadvertently transmitting the coronavirus to your eyes, from where it can enter your body.

Consider taking these additional preventative steps:

  • Use disinfectant wipes to clean the counters and other surfaces where you place the scleral-lens cases and solutions. This includes disinfecting the cases and containers of solutions before using.
  • Wash your hands before touching your eyes or removing your lenses.
  • Don’t touch the area on/near your eye and then someone else’s, or vice versa.
  • Avoid rubbing your eyes to prevent keratoconus from developing or worsening, while also reducing the risk of getting infected by coronavirus.

If you have keratoconus and are concerned about maintaining your optical health while reducing the risk of coronavirus, contact us.

 


Scleral Lens and Keratoconus Center at Envision Ghent Optometry treats patients with keratoconus in Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Chesapeake, Suffolk, and throughout Virginia.

References:

Scleral Lenses Can Prevent Dry Eye, Tiredness, and Discomfort

protect your eyes 640x350It’s not uncommon for certain contact lens wearers to suffer from eyes that feel dry, red, itchy, uncomfortable, and at times very painful. Eye drops and artificial tears can deliver relief, but they are no more than a temporary solution.

One of the best contact lenses for optimal comfort and hydration are scleral lenses, as they simultaneously provide vision correction, protect the eyes, and lubricate them.

What are Scleral Lenses?

These rigid gas permeable lenses have an extra-wide diameter that vaults over your whole cornea. In contrast to other contact lenses, they rest on the white part of your eyes (sclera) and not the cornea. As a result, scleral lenses consistently rank at the top of the charts when it comes to providing sharp visual acuity, comfort, and healthy eyes.

Common Contact Lens Complaints

Below we’ll explore the most common contact lens complaints we hear at our practice and ways scleral lenses can prevent them.

End-of-day tiredness and dry eyes

After just 6 to 8 hours of contact lens wear during the day, many contact lens wearers experience tired and dry eyes. Though standard hydrogel contact lenses allow a high concentration of oxygen to permeate the eye, some people need an alternative.

End-of-day eye discomfort can be resolved with scleral lenses, as these custom-designed lenses have a liquid reservoir between the lens and the cornea that provides a continuous moist environment that soothes tired, dry eyes.

Not only does this cushion of moisture lead to a comfortable wearing experience; it also promotes healthy eyes throughout the day, allowing you to wear these lenses for 12 to 14 hours! It is for this reason that many of our patients turn to scleral lenses for unparalleled comfort and all-day ocular hydration.

Chronic dry eye syndrome

Certain dry eye patients may experience painful, red, and swollen eyes. For them, traditional soft contact lenses can be unbearable because they sit right on the irritated cornea. Moreover, these contact lenses tend to act as sponges, soaking up the moisture from the surface of the eye.

If you struggle with dry eye syndrome and have been looking for a more effective treatment method beyond eyedrops and artificial tears, ask your Scleral Lens and Keratoconus Center at Envision Ghent Optometry doctor about scleral lenses.

Feeling the contact lens in the eye

Feeling your contact lenses in your eyes often indicates a poor fitting. Everyone’s eyes are different and when it comes to contact lenses, no size fits all. Furthermore, if lenses are insufficiently curved, they can be dislodged with every blink. This isn’t just uncomfortable — the wrong size lens can damage your cornea.

Because scleral lenses have a large diameter and are custom-made to your eye shape and size, it is almost impossible for scleral lenses to dislodge during normal wear. And since these lenses do not make contact with the surface of your cornea, there is a decreased risk of corneal abrasions.

Operating in dusty environments

Dry, dusty or dirty conditions can cause contact lenses to not only dry out, but can also lead irritants to attach themselves to the lenses. Scleral lenses offer comfort, even in dusty or dirty environments. This is because the lenses cover a large area of the eye, and since the outer layer of the lens protects the eye surface, dust and tiny particles can’t reach it. While not a complete barrier, scleral lenses can provide you with more relief and all-day comfort than traditional lenses.

If you’ve tried traditional contact lenses and have experienced any of the above, or if you’re simply seeking a more comfortable alternative to wear all day, it’s worth considering scleral lenses.

Contact a knowledgeable and experienced eye care professional, Dr. Nathalie Cassis, who will patiently assess and explain your condition to you. Dr. Nathalie Cassis will perform a specialized scleral lens custom-fitting to ensure that you receive the best fit for optimal visual clarity and comfort.

Call the Scleral Lens and Keratoconus Center at Envision Ghent Optometry today to schedule your consultation. We help patients from the Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Chesapeake, and Suffolk, in the Virginia area enjoy great vision and comfort with scleral lenses.

Traditional contact lens wearers can at times suffer from eyes that feel dry, red, itchy, and uncomfortable.

This may happen after a long day of wear, having the wrong contact lens fit, or as a result of operating in dusty environments.

Many turn to eye drops and artificial tears for relief, though they offer only a temporary solution.

For optimal comfort and hydration, consider scleral lenses.

They provide not only visual clarity, but also protect the eyes, while ensuring that they remain moist all day long.

Because scleral lenses have a large diameter and are custom-made to your eye, it is practically impossible for them to dislodge during normal wear.

Moreover, scleral lenses decrease the risk of corneal abrasion, as they do not make contact with the surface of your cornea.

Speak to your eye doctor about scleral lenses today!

What Is the Shape of a Healthy Eye and How Does It Affect Vision?

eyes eye care 640x350The human eye is a biological piece of functional art, capable of producing colorful moving three-dimensional images with high precision. At the same time, one can marvel at the aesthetic beauty of the human eye and its shape.

The Shape of a Healthy Eye

In a healthy and perfectly shaped eye, light passes through the cornea and crystalline lens, and is accurately focused onto the retina, located at the back of the gel-filled eyeball. This process enables an image to be passed onto the optic nerve and then the visual cortex of the brain. Accurate focus and convergence depend on the proper shape of each part of the eye. However, eyeballs can be either shortened (hyperopia) or elongated (myopia).

Unhealthy Eye Shapes That Impact Vision

The Myopic Eye

In an elongated myopic eyeball, the distance between the lens and retina is too long, leading the image to come into focus before reaching the retina. As a result, the photosensitive cells of the retina pick up a blurry image.

The Hyperopic Eye

In hyperopia or farsightedness, the opposite is the case. The eyeball is too short, as is the distance that light travels from lens to retina. Therefore, the image comes into focus behind the retina, causing distant objects to appear clear, whereas close ones do not come into proper focus.

The Cornea

While the crystalline lens is flexible and auto-adjusts its shape for proper focus, the cornea is static. A healthy cornea maintains its smooth dome shape. However, if the cornea is weak, the structure of the cornea cannot hold this round shape, causing the cornea to bulge outward and downward like a cone. Perfect curvature of the cornea ensures the correct bending of incoming light onto the lens, whereas inadequate curvature results in a refractive error.

An uneven or irregularly shaped cornea also distorts the image that forms at the retina. Common corneal irregularities include astigmatism and keratoconus.

Keratocoonus Labelled

Scleral Lenses for a Smooth Eye Shape

Scleral lenses are large contact lenses that rest on the sclera — the white part of the eye. The lenses span over the cornea, making them ideal for a deformed cornea as they even out the irregularity to create a perfectly shaped eye.

Contact Dr. Nathalie Cassis at Scleral Lens and Keratoconus Center at Envision Ghent Optometry to learn more about how your eye shape affects your vision. We’ll be happy to discuss the different correction methods available that offer you sharp, comfortable and clear vision all day, every day.

We receive clients from Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Chesapeake, Suffolk, and throughout Virginia.

 

Resources:

https://www.lasikmd.com/blog/eye-shapes-affect-vision

https://www.everydayhealth.com/vision-center/the-healthy-eye/how-the-eye-works.aspx

https://www.nvisioncenters.com/eye-shapes/

https://www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/eye-conditions-and-diseases/refractive-errors